Diving

Drop something in the lake?   Lose an expensive anchor?  Give us a call to discuss retrieval with one of our certified divers. Diving in Lake Lanier can be a challenge.  Visibility is low, and hazards abound on the lake bed such as trees, and miles of fishing line, making diving in Lake Lanier dangerous.  For this reason, our divers often work in pairs.  We can't guarantee that we'll find your anchor (or other lost object), but here are some tips that can help:
  • If the anchor is stuck, bring in as much scope as possible, so you are right over the anchor, and mark the location with a GPS.  If the GPS is not a handheld, be sure to note how far away from the bow the unit is.  It might be as much as 20 feet away from the bow.  Added to the unavoidable margin of error, that 20 feet can expand the circle that has to be searched quite a bit.
  • Look around you, and note landmarks in several directions that line up.  For example, if you are on a line between a boat ramp and a marker, note it, and look for another identifiable line that intersects.   Mark the spot on your lake map (you DO have a lake map on board, don't you?)
  • Record the dept before cutting the line and moving away.  Depths in the lake can change rapidly due to the mountainous terrain of out lake bottom, and is an important clue when looking for a specific location.
  • Attach a float to the line before you cut it.  This will allow the divers the ability to follow the line down to the anchor.  Sure, it lets other folks know that "there's something down there" but the chances of someone else getting the anchor up after you could not are slim, and there aren't teams of divers on "stand-by" to come steal yours as soon as a float is spotted.
Each situation is different.  Diving for an anchor, stuck in trees, in 40 feet of water, is much different than retrieving a dinghy outboard in 15 feet of water off of a dock.  This makes it difficult to estimate a job without understanding the details, so give us a call to discuss your diving needs.